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Make Your Data Memorable With An Audience Response System

An audience response system (ARS) is an excellent way to keep large groups engaged, entertained and actively thinking about your presentation. Not only will it offer a fresh format for your audience to enjoy, but the data you can collect will make your event more meaningful with very little effort on your part. Here are three key ways that the data from your audience response system will bring you closer to your listeners:

Providing Relatable Data

Well-researched statistics can be both useful and impressive, but too many can leave your audience feeling detached from the topic. By polling your room and using their responses alongside your researched figures, you can demonstrate how your topic directly applies to your audience, making a much bigger impact.

An ARS can also provide an organised way for your listeners to give feedback throughout your session, so you can track their general understanding and address any specific issues by tracing responses back to individual keypads.

Improving your story

You can use an ARS at your event to conduct a quick survey, to gain a better understanding of the people within your audience. This can allow you to adapt your content to make it more relevant. For instance, if your examples often refer to large corporations, and you discover your room is mostly filled with representatives from SMEs, you may be able to tailor those sections to make them more relevant for your audience.

Depending on the information, you may want to keep these audience responses anonymous and use the data for yourself, rather than broadcasting it to the room.

Learning From Each Other

The great part about large presentations is how diverse your audiences can be from session to session. Using electronic voting to interact with each group can reveal trends and variations, that you can in turn share with future groups.

Not only does it offer new and interesting information for each audience, it prevents the sessions from becoming too repetitive for you as a speaker!